Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Share pictures of your workspace/garage/shop, as well as any information about tools, tips and tricks that you have/use around your shop.
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Kdancy
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Post by Kdancy » 18 Jan 2010, 19:39

For anyone doing the phase converter thing, take the total number of hp that you are going to be using at any one time. I use 4 motors at once, air compressor and 3 spray booth fans, added the total hp and sized my phase converter a little on the extra side because of the air compressor start up amps, and it has worked out fine for me since the mid 80's. I changed out a capacitor in the phase converter a few times but that's it.

From the ACE site---
http://www.acephaseconverter.com/advanced-sizing.html
Mixed Loads

ACE Phase Converters can be used with mixed loads. This means that you can run motor loads, as well as resistive or inductive loads (Type 5) on the same converter simultaneously. However we do not recommend running CNC equipment on the same converter with other loads.
Multiple Loads

ACE Phase Converters can be used with multiple loads up to the capacity of the converter. In order to properly size a converter, we must first determine what motors will be starting at the same time, and what will be running at the same time.

Determine for your largest motor what load type number it is (1-4). Add your total motor HP together for all the motors starting at the same time. Look at the load type number column on the product selection page, and find the model that is equal to or greater than your total starting HP.

Now add together your total running HP, and for the model you previously selected make sure the cumulative HP is equal or greater to your total running load. If not, then step up to the next size that is equal or greater.

Now that we have determined the converter for your motor loads, we need to add in any type 5 loads. Look at the continuous output ampere rating for the model you selected, and add it with your type 5 amps. Now select the next model up which is equal or greater to that number on the continuous output rating.
CNC Loads

CNC loads are recommended to be run on their own separate converter from any other loads. Sizing is very simple, just take your max amp or kW rating from your CNC load and match it up with the CNC rating on the product selection page.
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Bob Andrews
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Post by Bob Andrews » 18 Jan 2010, 21:08

Thanks guys for the info. I'm looking at convertors on eBay right now. Will do research to figure out what I actually need if I'm going to do it. Sure would be great to have that big lunger if I can figure it out! Time will tell I guess...
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pacerman
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Re: Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Post by pacerman » 04 Jan 2011, 11:54

Man I am sooooo envious!!! :mrgreen: Super job Jeff!!! Makes my 24'x24' seem like a postage stamp!!! :roll:
Ian

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Jeff Rice
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Re: Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Post by Jeff Rice » 04 Jan 2011, 22:33

Well, size just scales up the cost... "Stuff fills available space"
Here's a pic of the latest scrap re-utilization...
I had some scrap plywood donated to me. Had one end all de-laminated from water damage.
Cut a foot off one end of each sheet. 4x7' sheets are good, right?
Spent my money on generic Lowe's Tyvec and 'glass insulation.
Cut the plywood to fit and screwed it all down.
Have a bunch of sheet metal shelving 'backs' to screw to the plywood for spark protection.
So far? Cost of screws, insulation, and Tyvek.....
Image

[quote="pacerman"]Man I am sooooo envious!!! :mrgreen: Super job Jeff!!! Makes my 24'x24' seem like a postage stamp!!! :roll:
Ian[/quote

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Sonny
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Re: Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Post by Sonny » 05 Jan 2011, 21:43

pacerman wrote:Man I am sooooo envious!!! :mrgreen: Super job Jeff!!! Makes my 24'x24' seem like a postage stamp!!! :roll:
Ian
You're way behind on the envious thing, Ian, ya gotta see how big it actually is! :shock: I've been jealous of the Jeffster's garage ever since I first laid eyes on the thing. It's bigger than the disassembly bay, here at our salvage yard, (and a LOT nicer too)! :mrgreen: 8)
Sonny

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Jeff Rice
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Re: Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Post by Jeff Rice » 06 Jan 2011, 21:26

Just a converted barn that had goat manure, dead chickens, horse stables (and poop).....
3+ years of working on a dirt floor...no doors...dirt on everything..
2010 was the breakthrough year... Floors and doors.
Started with that goal Jan 1st, and actually installed the service door Dec 31st....
It's still a somewhat crude pole barn... But it is getting there...
A little here...and a little there...
Jeff 8)
Sonny wrote:
pacerman wrote:Man I am sooooo envious!!! :mrgreen: Super job Jeff!!! Makes my 24'x24' seem like a postage stamp!!! :roll:
Ian
You're way behind on the envious thing, Ian, ya gotta see how big it actually is! :shock: I've been jealous of the Jeffster's garage ever since I first laid eyes on the thing. It's bigger than the disassembly bay, here at our salvage yard, (and a LOT nicer too)! :mrgreen: 8)

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Karl
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Re: Low Tech Stude Workshop Project

Post by Karl » 07 Jan 2011, 09:25

youve'd come along way baby,and it looking good 8) :wink:
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